Gone but not forgotten

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Postby Kylos The Jackal on Wed Oct 19, 2005 11:22 am

I heard you vom'd out the van ? :)
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manners

Postby FrankM on Thu Oct 20, 2005 8:38 pm

Gentlemen do not "vom" out of van windows and if they did friends of the gentlemen would refrain from comment.
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Re: manners

Postby Dino Martini on Sat Oct 22, 2005 12:02 pm

FrankM wrote:Gentlemen do not "vom" out of van windows and if they did friends of the gentlemen would refrain from comment.


Quite! Which raises questions....

1 - "vom" stains on the van indicate that it was obviously not a gentleman who was responsible.

2 - risible/amusing as it may be, this is hardly the correct forum to mention unsavoury incidents of this nature... I believe that there is another, considerably more appropriate, heading for this kind of thing.

Vegas'ly yours,

DINO
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"Hey, tune me in and get my signal right, or else there'll be no rockin' tonight!"...
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the wit and wisdom of George Best

Postby Frankie Sumatra on Fri Nov 25, 2005 4:47 pm

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"I used to go missing a lot...Miss Canada, Miss UK, Miss World."

"I blew hundreds of thousands of pounds on wine, women and song - the rest I just squandered."

"In 1969 I gave up alcohol and women: it was the worst 20 minutes of my life."

"I was in for 10 hours and had 40 pints - beating my previous record by 20 minutes" (following a blood transfusion after his liver transplant).
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Richard Pryor

Postby Doug-o on Thu Dec 22, 2005 12:11 am

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Postby swinginjb on Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:11 am

"The greatest thing you will ever learn is just to dig and be dug in return."
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Land of a 1000 Dances

Postby FrankM on Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:03 pm

It's only available on his Double hits package A Man And A Half but there's an incendiary live version of In The Midnight Hour recorded at the 5/4 Ballroom Los Angeles in August 1965. The original studio musicians Booker T and The Mar-Keys were backing him on stage and he was introduced by and traded vocal licks with KGFC Radio jock Magnificent Montague. His catch phrase at the time was "Burn, bay Burn" and Wilson reponds with "Have Mercy baby!" As the onstage tension builds up it is left to Al Jackson to break it with a riff on the drums not matched till a year later in Manchester when Mickey Jones followed Dylan's instruction to "Play it F*****G Loud" and the band struck up Like a Rolling Stone.

Anyway Wilson tore down the house and left it asunder. A few days later Los Angeles well mostly Watts went up in flames and Montague adopted "Have Mercy baby" as his new phrase.

If you haven't seen Wilson Pickett and his own band in Soul To Soul you should. The man was a top class performer.

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Chris Penn

Postby Doug-o on Fri Jan 27, 2006 5:11 pm

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Ivor Cutler

Postby Doug-o on Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:39 am

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Lou Rawls

Postby Dino Martini on Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:45 pm

I meant to add soul legend Lou Rawls to this list - he actually passed away on the 6th of January (at the age of 72) in a Los Angeles hospital, after suffering for months with lung and brain cancer.

Rawls has long been known for his ultra-distinctive deep voice that graced songs ranging from Gospel to Jazz to Disco over his nearly 50 year career (he also served for several years as the TV spokesman for Budweiser!). However, he will also be remembered for his charitable work, particularly his annual telethon for the United Negro College Fund.

Regular patrons at Vegas! will doubtless be familiar with his wonderful version of 'Girl From Ipanema' and also 'Nobody But Me'.

For more info about his career, check out www.lourawls.com

Another great voice has joined the choir invisible...
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DINO MARTINI
"Hey, tune me in and get my signal right, or else there'll be no rockin' tonight!"...
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BILLY PRESTON

Postby Dino Martini on Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:10 pm

Billy Preston - often referred-to as "the fifth Beatle" - died in Arizona on Tuesday after a long illness. He was 59 years old, and had been in a coma at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea (in Scottsdale, Arizona) since last November after suffering kidney failure and related illnesses.

William Everett Preston was born in Houston (Texas) on the 9th of September 1946 and, at the age of 2, moved with his family to Los Angeles. He appeared in the 1958 film "St. Louis Blues", starring Nat King Cole as bluesman W.C. Handy (Preston played the part of Handy as a child). Gospel legend Mahalia Jackson was also in the film, and he would later go on to play organ on some of her best-known recordings.

A keyboard prodigy (reputedly playing from the age of 3!!!), he spent most of his life in the entertainment business. Whilst a teenager, he played with the likes of Mahalia Jackson, Little Richard and Ray Charles. With his Afro hairstyle, instantly recognisable gap-toothed smile and funky clothing style, he was an extremely popular on-stage performer.

Little Richard hired Preston to join his backing band (in 1962) for a European tour, where he first met the Beatles during their residency at the Star Club in Hamburg, and also Sam Cooke (who signed him to his SAR label). Sadly, Cooke was killed two years later and Preston then signed with Vee Jay records (once the American label for the Beatles), through which he released an instrumental gospel record.

After playing in the house band for the "Shindig," TV show, he joined Ray Charles' band. George Harrison brought him into the Apple Studios in January 1969 when The Beatles were barely speaking to each other while working on the "Let It Be" film and recording projects. He helped to soothe some of the tension and famously performed on both sides of the "Get Back"/"Don't Let Me Down" single, which was credited to "The Beatles with Billy Preston" - the ONLY time the band shared the label credit with another musician. He also accompanied them during the famous 'rooftop' concert - their last live performance as a band. His organ playing can also be heard on such Beatle songs as "Let It Be", "I Want You (She's So Heavy)", and "Something". Harrison signed him to Apple Records and co-produced Preston's two albums for the label, "That's the Way God Planned It" and "Encouraging Words".

Billy also contributed to many Beatle solo albums, including Harrison's "All Things Must Pass", John Lennon's "Sometime in New York City" and Ringo Starr's "Sentimental Journey". He also won a Grammy award as a performer on the 1973 album of the year "The Concert for Bangladesh", produced by George Harrison.

Billy topped the charts in the early '70s as a solo act with the Grammy-winning instrumental "Outa Space", "Will It Go Round in Circles", & "Nothing From Nothing". He also wrote "You Are So Beautiful", which was a major hit for Joe Cocker in 1974.

His credits with the Rolling Stones included the albums "Sticky Fingers" and "Black and Blue". Mick Jagger even danced seductively with Preston in the video for "Hey Negrita". He played with the Stones on a number of tours, as well as being their 'opening act'.

He later toured with Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood, as well as Motown session musicians the Funk Brothers. He also was featured on Ray Charles' last album "Genius Loves Company," as well as the latest albums by Neil Diamond and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Gone, but never to be forgotten.

"That's The Way God Planned It"...


Ciao,

DINO
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DINO MARTINI
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Postby bez man on Mon Sep 04, 2006 12:55 pm

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Steve "crocodile hunter" Irwin

Steve Irwin was to my generation what David Attenborough was to my parents. The man was quite simply a legend in every sense of the word. I can`t think of any modern enviromentalist/Tv personality/man that i heave felt such affection for.

The sheer unbridled enthusiasm this man possessed and portrayed towards ANY subject he described, was a joy to behold. If he felt excited, he made damn sure you knew it and more often than not that excitement would jump from the screen and infect the viewer. No one man can be creditted with demystifying more of the less cuddly creatures on this earth, and explaining why we should cherish such things.

Steve died after being stabbed through the heart by a stingrays tail, while filming off the Great Barrier reef, and without wanting to use this as a cliche, he died doing what he loved.

i was genuinly taken aback when i heard this news this morning, and type this with a lump in my throat.

Rest in peace, Crocodile Hunter
I bet I`m the only one that looks like Jesus
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Anita O'Day

Postby FrankM on Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:01 pm

I'm not much of a Scat fan but Anita O'day was a top class vocalist.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,,1957644,00.html




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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EulUSHyOUiU
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No more "Fluff" on the needle...

Postby Dino Martini on Wed Nov 29, 2006 1:37 pm

Alan Leslie "Fluff" Freeman CBE.

Born 6th July 1927 in Melbourne, Australia ~ died 27th November 2006 in Twickenham, England.

Born and educated in Melbourne, after leaving school he worked as an assistant paymaster/accountant for one of Australia's largest timber companies.

Alan Freeman originally wanted to be an opera singer, but decided that his voice wasn't strong enough. In 1952 he was invited to audition as a radio announcer and started working in Tasmania for radio station 7LA, known as "the teenager's station", where his duties included being continuity announcer; presenting music programmes (incorporating opera, ballet and classical music!); DJ for the top 100; news reader; quiz master, and voicing commercials. He soon moved back to mainland Australia, to radio station 3KZ in his home town of Melbourne. However, in 1957 (after breaking up with his fiancée), he set out to travel around the world, intending to resume his job with 3KZ at the end of nine months in January 1958. But his stop-off in London turned out to be permanent and he never completed his journey home. Numerous letters were sent to explain his delay, with one finally becoming an apology to his Melbourne employer.

Alan started his British career as a summer relief disc jockey on Radio Luxembourg, and continued to present late-evening programmes on the station until the early 1970s. In 1961 he moved to the BBC Light Programme (now known as Radio 1) as presenter of the 'Records Around Five' show, which was introduced by his signature tune 'At The Sign Of The Swinging Cymbal' (by Brian Fahey). In September 1961 he introduced 'Pick of the Pops' as part of a Saturday evening show 'Trad Tavern'. 'Pick Of The Pops' became a permanent show in its own right in 1962, with Alan fronting it until 1972. At the same time, he was one of the original team of presenters of BBC TV's 'Top of the Pops', and a regular member of the 'Juke Box Jury' panel.

In April 1972, Alan joined the ranks of daily presenters on Radio 1, taking over the afternoon (3pm to 5pm) show from Terry Wogan. This continued until June 1, 1973. During this time at Radio 1 he spotlighted youth clubs & young people and became Vice-President of the London Association of Youth Clubs. During the 1970s he also presented the Radio 1 series 'Quiz Kid' on Sunday evenings, which was recorded at Youth and Boys Clubs all over the country; while on Saturday afternoons he presented his iconic 'Rock Show', featuring heavy & prog-rock, and a regular rundown of the current album chart, from 1973 until 1978.

In 1979 he left the BBC to work for Capital Radio, till 1988, reviving both 'Pick of the Pops' (now called 'Pick of the Pops Take 3') and 'The Rock Show'. He returned to the BBC and Radio 1 in January 1989 to revive both 'The Rock Show' and 'Pick of the Pops'. This run of 'Pick of the Pops' ended on December 27, 1992, but he continued to host 'The Rock Show' until October 23, 1993, when he, along with other long-serving DJs, left the station as it was revamped by controller Matthew Bannister.

In December 1993 he presented the 'Alternative Chart Show' on a trial one-off Restricted Service Licence broadcast by xFM in London. He then hosted 'Pick of the Pops Take 3' on Capital Gold from April 1994 until late 1996. In 1996 and 1997 he also hosted 'The Rock Show' on Virgin Radio, and he was also heard presenting one-off shows on Classic FM.

Alan returned to the BBC on BBC Radio 2, taking 'Pick of the Pops' back to its home from 1997 until 2000. His life-long love of classical music, and particularly opera, was developed in the show 'Their Greatest Bits'. But as arthritis got the better of his hands, he eventually handed 'Pick of the Pops' over to Dale Winton.

In his later years, Alan suffered from severe arthritis and asthma (not helped by his 60 a day smoking habit!) and, suffering a minor stroke six years ago, he used a Zimmer Frame or motorised wheelchair to get around. He lived at Brinsworth House, a retirement home in Twickenham, for actors and performers run by the Entertainment Artistes Benevolent Fund until his death.

Alan's distinctive presenting style included the frequent use of classical music 'stings' between records, and memorable catchphrases such as "Greetings, Pop Pickers", "All right?" and "Not 'arf!". His style has been much parodied, and he was the model for Harry Enfield's popular character 'Dave Nice' - although he contributed to the satire himself, with typical good grace, by actually appearing on the show.

During the 1960s, Alan briefly attempted an acting career, notably in Dr. Terror's House of Horrors, but his limitations were apparent, and in other films he simply appeared as himself. He also played God (albeit an omnipotent being who sat at a mixing desk and said "All right?") in two episodes of The Young Ones in 1984.

Numerous versions exist regarding the source of his nickname "Fluff", but Alan maintained that it came about after he'd once put a white sweater (a gift from his mother, apparantly) in the wash, and it had come out looking like a fluffy sheeps fleece. Persisting in wearing it, a colleague spotted him coming in to work one day and said "here comes fluffy Freeman", and the nickname stuck.

In 1998 he was awarded the CBE, and in May 2000 he was presented with The Lifetime Achievement award at the Sony Radio Academy Awards.

For all his supposed clichés and archetypes in his broadcasting style, he was always regarded as a true original by his fellow broadcasters, and when he appeared on John Peel's 'This Is Your Life', John said: "Fluff was the greatest out-and-out disc jockey of them all."

"Old DJ's never die - they just groove away"

Amen to that, pop-pickers.
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DINO MARTINI
"Hey, tune me in and get my signal right, or else there'll be no rockin' tonight!"...
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Ahmet Ertegun

Postby Dino Martini on Sat Dec 16, 2006 5:52 pm

Ahmet Ertegun wa an exceptionally talented man and a true legend in the music industry. My record collection probably comprises of more songs and artists either written, produced or signed-up by him than anybody else.

The following come from the New York Times, and is well worth reading...

Ahmet Ertegun, the music magnate who founded Atlantic Records and shaped the careers of John Coltrane, Ray Charles, the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and many others, died yesterday in Manhattan, at the age of 83, as a result of a brain injury suffered when he fell backstage at the Beacon Theater in Manhattan on the 29th of October as the Rolling Stones prepared to play a concert that marked former President Bill Clinton’s 60th birthday. He had been in a coma since then.

“Few people have had a bigger impact on the record industry than Ahmet,” David Geffen, the entertainment mogul, said yesterday in a telephone interview from Los Angeles, “and no one loved American music more than he did.”

Mr. Geffen said that Mr. Ertegun “started me in the record business” in 1970 by helping to finance his first record company, Asylum, “just as he gave many independent entrepreneurs the chance to start their own companies.”

Mr. Ertegun was the dapper son of a Turkish diplomatic family. He was equally at home at a high-society soiree or a rhythm and blues club, the kind of place where, in the 1950s, he found the performers who went on to make hits for Atlantic Records, one of the most successful American independent music labels.

He was an astute judge of both musical talent and business potential, surrounding himself with skillful producers and remaking R&B for the pop mainstream. As Atlantic Records grew from a small independent label into a major national music company, it became a stronghold of soul, with Aretha Franklin and Otis Redding, and of rock, with the Stones, Led Zeppelin and Yes.

Ever conscious of the music’s roots, Mr. Ertegun was also a prime mover in starting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. In a music career marked by numerous lifetime achievement awards, he was inducted into the hall in 1987.

Mr. Ertegun said he fell in love with music when he was 9. In 1932, his older brother, Nesuhi, took him to see the Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway orchestras at the Palladium Theater in London. The beauty of the jazz, the power of the beat and the elegance of the musicians made a lasting impression.

His instincts were not impeccable. He lost out on chances to sign the Beatles and Elvis Presley. But in an industry in which backstabbing is commonplace, Mr. Ertegun was admired as a shrewd businessman with a passion for the creative artists and the music he nurtured.

Along with a partner, Herb Abramson, Mr. Ertegun founded Atlantic Records in 1947 in an office in a derelict hotel on West 56th Street in Manhattan. His initial investment of $10,000 was borrowed from his family dentist.

By the 1950s, Atlantic developed a unique sound, best described as the mixed and polygamous marriage of Mr. Ertegun’s musical loves. He and his producers mingled blues and jazz with the mambo of New Orleans, the urban blues of Chicago, the swing of Kansas City and the sophisticated rhythms and arrangements of New York.

Mr. Ertegun often signed musicians who had been seasoned on the R&B circuit, and pushed them toward perfecting their performances in the recording studio. Every so often, with his name spelled in reverse as Nugetre, Mr. Ertegun appeared as the songwriter on R&B hits like “Chains of Love” and “Sweet Sixteen.”

In 1954, Atlantic released both “I Got a Woman” by Ray Charles and “Shake, Rattle and Roll” by Joe Turner. (Mr. Ertegun was a backup singer on “Shake, Rattle and Roll.”) The songs had a good beat, and people danced to them. They were among the strongest roots of rock and roll.

After his brother Nesuhi joined Atlantic in 1956, the label attracted many of the most inventive jazz musicians of the era, including Coltrane, Charles Mingus, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Ornette Coleman. In 1957, Atlantic was among the first labels to record in stereo.

By the 1960s, often in partnerships with local labels like Stax in Memphis, Mr. Ertegun was selling millions of records by the leading soul musicians of the day, among them Ms. Franklin and Mr. Redding. Ms. Franklin had recorded previously for Columbia Records, but her hits for Atlantic — which merged her gospel roots with an earthy strength and sensuality — were the ones that made her the Queen of Soul.

Mr. Ertegun’s music partnerships, he sometimes pointed out, were often culturally triangular. He was Turkish and a Muslim by birth. Many of his fellow executives, like the producer Jerry Wexler, were Jewish. The artists they produced, particularly when the label began, were black. Together, they helped move rhythm and blues to the center of American popular music.

Mr. Ertegun and Ioana Maria Banu were married on April 6, 1961. Known as Mica, she became a prominent interior designer. She survives him, as does a sister. Nesuhi Ertegun died in 1989.

The Ertegun brothers and their partner, Mr. Wexler, sold the Atlantic label to Warner Brothers-Seven Arts in 1967 for $17 million in stock. Four years later, the brothers took some of the money and founded the New York Cosmos soccer team.

But Mr. Ertegun kept making records. When Kinney National Service — a conglomerate of parking lots, funeral parlors, rental cars and other unmusical enterprises — completed the acquisition of Warner Brothers-Seven Arts in 1969, he and his label kept going.

Mr. Ertegun was now a rock mogul. Atlantic Records signed the Stones to a distribution deal when the band’s contract with Decca Records ended; Led Zeppelin; and Crosby, Stills & Nash, who became Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young after Mr. Ertegun persuaded Neil Young to join the group. The corporations changed — Kinney turned into Warner Communications, which became Time Warner — but Atlantic and its founder still flourished.

It remained one of the only record labels of the 1940s to survive the multibillion-dollar mergers and acquisitions of the 1990s in more than name only, with its founder still in charge. Mr. Ertegun reduced his daily corporate duties in 1996 but remained an inveterate night-clubber, avid concertgoer and insatiable music maven well into his 80s.

Ahmet Ertegun was born in Istanbul on July 31, 1923. His father, Mehmet Munir, was the legal counselor to Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey.

In 1925, Ataturk sent the elder Ertegun to serve as the Turkish representative to the League of Nations. In the next 20 years, he was the Turkish ambassador to Switzerland, to France, to the Court of St. James under King George V and to the United States during the Roosevelt administration. The young Ahmet grew up in that worldly realm. His father, then the dean of the diplomatic corps in Washington, died in 1944.

That year, at 21, having earned a bachelor’s degree at St. John’s College in Annapolis, Md., Mr. Ertegun was taking graduate courses in medieval philosophy at Georgetown University.

“In between, I spent hours in a rhythm and blues record shop in the black ghetto in Washington,” he told the graduates of Berklee College of Music in Boston on receiving an honorary degree in 1991. “Almost every night, I went to the Howard Theater and to various jazz and blues clubs.”

“I had to decide whether I would go into a scholastic life or go back to Turkey in the diplomatic service, or do something else,” he said. “What I really loved was music, jazz, blues, and hanging out.” And so, he told the students, he did what he loved.
~~~

Now that's what I call an obituary!

You may also be interested to know that Amhet Ertegun had a link with Scotland. He signed The Average White Band to Atlantic and produced much of their output that propelled them to world-wide acclaim, starting with their first album for the label - AWB (the 'white' album, as it's commonly known).

He will be missed.
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DINO MARTINI
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